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Web Piracy Costs Europe money and jobs
Category : General 26 Mar 2010 02:02 AM | Industry News
A report by the firm on behalf of the International Chamber of Commerce that looked at the impact of internet piracy in the UK, as well as Germany, France, Italy and Spain, also revealed 250,000 jobs could be lost in the UK alone.
Tera Consultants said that in 2008, internet piracy caused 1.25bn worth of losses in Europe, proving it's a "major threat to the creative industries in terms of loss of employment and revenues".
The report comes ahead of the European Parliament's vote on the Gallo report on enforcement of intellectual property rights in the internal market, which civil rights campaign group La Quadrature du Net criticised for not addressing the challenges of the internet. Jim Killock, executive director of the Open Rights Group, said, I am fed up of hearing corporate propaganda being deployed in order to justify intrusions on our rights to freedom of speech, privacy and to a fair trial. He said the Open Rights Group had no truck with infringement of copyright, but it was shameful that anyone from the Labour movement could justify the removal of vital services such as the internet as a punishment.
The report takes data from EU governments, the World Intellectual Property Organisation and the EU's own stats and processes that information in such a way to reach the conclusion that by 2015 1.2 million jobs and ?240 billion will be lost within the Union's creative industries.
Figures in the report show that in 2008 alone, entertainment and multimedia industries earned $1.17 trillion but lost $13.6 billion to piracy. In the same year the industry employed 14.4 million people accounting for 6.5 percent of the European workforce while 186,000 jobs were lost. The study says that if this trend continues to develop, nearly 1.2 million jobs and $327 billion might be swallowed by 2015.